What should authors who are lukewarm about FB and Twitter do? Where should readers go for their bookish news?? (#WritingLife #AmReading)

A few updates…

I just posted my thoughts on my June Reading Challenge choices. I’ll post July’s choices tomorrow. As much as I want you all to read with me (and tell me your thoughts on the books), the other reasons I’m continuing my 2017 Reading Challenge is to be more purposeful with my own reading and to just encourage reading in general. Hey, we all have to do our part, right?

I sent out my June newsletter on June 30th with only a few hours to spare. When I started the newsletter, I wanted to make it a little different than this blog and one thing I promised was less frequent, but more consistent, content. I was having a minor panic attack at the thought of getting that newsletter out late. What’s in it? See for yourself here (hint: there’s a quiz, a recipe contest, my quarterly giveaway, and a Noon #5 update).

In other news…

EarlyWord, the publisher/librarian connection, co-founded and edited by Nora Rawlinson, announced Monday that is was ceasing publication. I read the news that day at work (for any new followers, I moonlight as a part-time librarian at my local library) and my immediate, albeit childish, one word response to EarlyWord‘s last word was…

Noooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Admittedly, I was a late-on-the-scene reader, but I’ve faithfully followed nearly every post of EarlyWord‘s for a year now (since I first started working at the library). I even mentioned my love for it just two months ago here (toward the end of the post, buried under the Giveaway subheading). Geesh, the whole thing reminded me of when GalleyCat stopped publishing back in December. And who remembers the amazing SF Signal?! (At least they still tweet.) Just in the last two weeks, both Wendig and Scalzi shared that their blog traffic numbers were way down. So, upon further refection, I’m amending my earlier initial one word response to news like this to a more mature two word response a la Dana Freeling in 1982’s Poltergeist:

What’s happening?!?!?!?!?!?!?

Answer: Read their blogs… or just consult your own gut feelings about how the current political climate + the ways in which people read blog content now has changed things for authors. Again. Sigh.

So what’s an author who is lukewarm about Facebook and Twitter to do? Hell if I know. If you do, let me know in the comments. (This is not, btw, a shake down. I’m not asking yet again what people want to see from this blog. It’s really an invitation to any other writer out there who doesn’t love FB or Twitter to come whine with me.)

So where on earth are readers supposed to go today to get their bookish news?? Obviously, there are other sources (and, as always, I’m interested in hearing yours), but EarlyWord‘s loss will be deeply felt by me. I’m going to try to find an acceptable alternative, but it may take a while…

In the meantime, WordPress informed me that TODAY IS MY 6TH ANNIVERSARY WITH THEM. Happy Blogoversary to me! 😀

 

What else has been happening?

Our vampire eradication business is well underway. Last week, we brought home a huge trailer full of stakes and I spent the Fourth of July filling the kids’ water bottles with garlickly holy water. (Obviously, kidding. We replaced a bunch of fence posts and I made garlic chicken in my slow-cooker.)

I visited Ladew Gardens to check out their new and old art. To the left is Mary Ann Mears’ painted steel sculpture, “Queen.” (Literature provided to members says, “The queen has feminine curves; her pointed crown suggests power and she looks like she is armed with daggers; a warrior pawn stands by her side.” To me, it looks like the queen’s attendant is wielding a sickle. What do you think?) The sculpture is temporarily on display in the Wildflower Meadow until Halloween. As for the statue on the right, I couldn’t find a title, but you can help name it. Let’s take our inspiration from existing book titles…


Finally, I visited Annapolis, went to one of their First Sunday Arts Fests, and had the only piece of artwork I was interested in bought out from under me. And I watched Tugg unsuccessfully battle our lawn sprinkler. Afterward, he was soaked but happy. Hope you are too! 🙂

[Editor’s Note (i.e. my note – blogs have no editors, they are imperfect, bloggers even more so): An earlier version of this post referred to Dominique Dunne, the young actress who played Dana Freeling. At the time of the post, I hadn’t known that she was murdered the same year that Poltergeist came out. It was shocking, sad news for me, even almost forty years later.]

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June’s Reading Challenge – The #Fae

I’m going to continue to be generally offline through the summer. I’ll still be posting the previously scheduled 5 Photos posts and my monthly Reading Challenge posts, and I’ll be sending out an author newsletter toward the end of the month, but that’s about it. Enjoy your summer! Hope it’s full of lots of reading and writing!!

June Reading Challenge Choices

(Descriptions from Goodreads)

A Court of Thorns and Roses

Feyre’s survival rests upon her ability to hunt and kill – the forest where she lives is a cold, bleak place in the long winter months. So when she spots a deer in the forest being pursued by a wolf, she cannot resist fighting it for the flesh. But to do so, she must kill the predator and killing something so precious comes at a price …

Dragged to a magical kingdom for the murder of a faerie, Feyre discovers that her captor, his face obscured by a jewelled mask, is hiding far more than his piercing green eyes would suggest. Feyre’s presence at the court is closely guarded, and as she begins to learn why, her feelings for him turn from hostility to passion and the faerie lands become an even more dangerous place. Feyre must fight to break an ancient curse, or she will lose him forever.

Darkfever

When her sister is murdered, leaving a single clue to her death—a cryptic message on MacKayla Lane’s cell phone–Mac journeys to Ireland in search of answers. The quest to find her sister’s killer draws her into a shadowy realm where nothing is as it seems, where good and evil wear the same treacherously seductive mask. She is soon faced with an even greater challenge: staying alive long enough to learn how to handle a power she had no idea she possessed—a gift that allows her to see beyond the world of man, into the dangerous realm of the Fae.

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell

At the dawn of the nineteenth century, two very different magicians emerge to change England’s history. In the year 1806, with the Napoleonic Wars raging on land and sea, most people believe magic to be long dead in England–until the reclusive Mr Norrell reveals his powers, and becomes a celebrity overnight.

Soon, another practicing magician comes forth: the young, handsome, and daring Jonathan Strange. He becomes Norrell’s student, and they join forces in the war against France. But Strange is increasingly drawn to the wildest, most perilous forms of magic, straining his partnership with Norrell, and putting at risk everything else he holds dear.

What about my May choices?

I didn’t do as much reading last month as I wanted to. Karin A. suggested I read A KISS OF STEEL, so I started with that one. I’m enjoying it, although it’s more vampire romance than steampunk. I like the characters and the world. So far, it seems like a great start to a terrific PNR series. But I’ll need to find time to dig into my other steampunk choices at some point…

What about you?? Did you read anything interesting last month? Are you taking a vacation this summer? Where are you going? Any fictional worlds you wish you could visit?

#Writing #Workshops for July (and a frog picture)

Below are the online workshops being offered in July by RWA’s Fantasy, Futuristic, and Paranormal Chapter. If you are a writing instructor and are interested in teaching a workshop, please contact me for available dates, rates, and proposal submission guidelines.

"I'd kiss a frog even if there was no promise of a Prince Charming popping out of it. I love frogs." --Cameron Diaz
“I’d kiss a frog even if there was no promise of a Prince Charming popping out of it. I love frogs.”
–Cameron Diaz

For my birthday this year, I toured Ladew Gardens. I didn’t kiss any frogs, but I did get poison ivy. 😦 I still loved it. It’s smaller than Longwood Gardens, but closer. Highlights were the Butterfly House, topiaries, and Manor House with its oval library and vintage book collection. I took the above picture at the Tivoli Tea House & Garden.

Ok, now on to this month’s workshops!! 🙂

Time Management for Writers:

How to Finish That Book Even When Life Gets in the Way

07/06/2015 – 07/19/2015

Do you feel like you can never find the time to write?  Have you been chipping away at the same manuscript forever without much progress?  Do you need a system that can get you to typing “The End” with success and satisfaction? Wrangling a fickle muse to meet a deadline—or just to get rid of that looming blank page—is a life-skill for everyone who wants to get serious about their writing.  Multi-published author Allie Pleiter shares the nuts and bolts of how to manage your muse, set goals and deadlines, and tackle the process of professional creativity using her popular Chunky Method.  With a useful mix of the practical, the inspirational, and the nitty-gritty real life of it all, Allie Pleiter gives aspiring or working writers the tools they need to make the magic happen.

About the Presenter, Allie Pleiter

An avid knitter, BBC Television geek and French macaron enthusiast, Allie Pleiter writes both fiction and non-fiction working on as many as four novels at a time.  The enthusiastic but slightly untidy author of over two dozen books, Allie spends her days writing, buying yarn, and finding new ways to avoid housework.  Allie hails from Connecticut, moved to the midwest to attend Northwestern University, and currently lives outside Chicago, Illinois.  The “dare from a friend” to begin writing has produced a fourteen-year career with nearly one million books sold.  In addition to writing, Allie regularly speaks on faith, the creative process, women’s issues, and her very favorite topic—time management for writers.

Cost: FFP Members:$20.00/Non-Members: $25.00

Register for This Workshop

Social Media Platforms:

Deciding Which One Works Best For You

07/06/2015 – 07/19/2015

You’ve signed up for Facebook, posted a picture of your dog, and your friends liked it.  Now what?  With the ever-changing world of social media, it can be intimidating and confusing when deciding what works best for your author platform.  In this workshop, you will learn the facets of Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and Pinterest and what types of content work best for each. In addition, you will learn strategies for using each platform to present a seamless author brand and build your reading community.  Finally, we will cover some tools you can use to make keeping up with social media a little easier.

Experience Level: Beginner to Intermediate

About the Presenter, Jessica McQuaid

Jessica McQuaid always wanted to be a writer.  Then she found out writers had to market their books.  Planning accordingly, Jessica got her undergraduate degree with honors in creative writing before moving on to get her MBA with a concentration in marketing.

Believing that book smarts didn’t always equal street smarts, she left the academic world to garner marketing knowledge in the big bad world of corporate America.  And when she was done figuring out what they knew, she founded Someday Lady Publishing to help other authors with the sometimes daunting task of marketing their books.  From WordPress sites to newsletters, from tweets to blog tours, Jessica has helped countless authors make sense of the seemingly endless world of marketing.

Jessica makes her home in the great state of New Hampshire where she lives with her husband and two very opinionated Basset Hounds.

Cost: FFP Members:$20.00/Non-Members: $25.00

Register for This Workshop

So Long Summer!

Labor Day weekend seems like it was 500 days ago and, with September now well underway, idyllic summer feels like a distant memory. My kids have been back in school for two weeks. School year Saturdays just aren’t the same as summer ones. To celebrate (lament?) a return to cerebral pursuits, academic endeavors, and maximum productivity, here’s a round-up of nonsense from the last part of my summer 2014.

Beautiful Bay

Some of you may remember my story about getting towed into the dock Memorial Day weekend… It took all summer, but my FIL was finally able to track down the parts he needed and make necessary repairs. (Yay, Pops!) We were only able to take one boat ride this summer, but it was spectacular, perhaps because it was singular. 😀

Chesapeake Bay MarylandThe Ghosts of Roanoke

My family road tripped to Tennessee again this summer. This year, we stopped in Roanoke, Virginia on the way down. We’ve stopped there before because it’s about halfway, but we’d never stayed in the Hotel Roanoke. It was great! If you find yourself in the area, I’d definitely recommend it. Built in 1882, it has lots of character and history. It’s old but beautiful and there’s a convenient sky walk that you can take over the rail tracks into town. I found the place inspiring so I took lots of pictures. My husband then thought it would be fun to download one of those “ghost apps” where you can edit your pics by inserting ghosts. Later, we tried to convince our kids that the doctored up pics were real, but they were having none of it. Still, it was a hoot. We used Paranormal Activity Booth. One immediate downside was that the spectral additions don’t show up well against anything dark, which is, of course, exactly the type of pictures you want to add ghosts to.

Hotel Roanoke

Have any of you used an app that adds ghosts or other supernatural elements to your photos? Are there better ones out there?

B-17 Bomber Memphis Belle

Labor Day weekend we flew to Ocean City. We took off from our home airport, Martin State, which was hosting a B 17 Bomber, the Memphis Belle, that day. All sorts of people were on site to see it and (for those willing to splurge — flights are $450!) take a ride. I was in the terminal when the Memphis Belle went taxiing by but my oldest managed to take a few pics. Nothing like being snuck up on by a B 17 bomber when your mum’s in the loo. LOL. 😀

Ocean City, New Jersey
Honorable Mention: Cats and Coasters

For fun, figured I’d also throw in a cute cat pic and share what my favorite roller coaster of the summer was:

GRIFFIN AT BUSCH GARDENS

205 foot, 75 mph drop. We sat in the front and rode it twice. For what it’s worth, we also checked out the newest coaster at Dollywood, the FireChaser Express. My take? Meh. It was okay. My husband and kids didn’t like it at all. It just wasn’t exciting enough, but I get why the park replaced the old Adventure Mountain with the new FireChaser.

Who needs boats, planes, ghosts, or coasters?
Who needs boats, planes, ghosts, or coasters?

Next week, I have a guest blogger and I’ll share 10 things I read or watched this summer that you may want to check out too. Best wishes for the weekend, everyone!

The month of leaves and roses… and inclines, fountains, cakes, and columns… movies, mail, ducks, and dragons

Last day of June, “the month of leaves and roses,” in the words of poet N.P. Willis, “When pleasant sights salute the eyes…” and the month when all sorts of interesting and/or everyday things happen.

SUMMER ROAD TRIPS

Allegheny River

Long time followers know how I love my summer road trips. Shortly after my last post, I took my daughters back to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the city where I grew up. We stayed with my childhood bestie (the same friend I backpacked through Europe with in 1995, pictured here, at the end of the post, with me and two other friends in Rome). She’s a bio teacher and always has a house full of interesting pets in the summer: cockatiels, birds of prey, a bearded dragon, as well as cats and one Australian Cattle Dog/Lab Mix.

During our visit, we rode up the Duquesne Incline, a centuries-old cable car that roughly follows the path of an old coal hoist. It’s a really, neat, unique thing to do if you ever find yourself in the ‘burgh. The incline was voted one of the Top Ten sites in the world from which to view a cityscape by USA Today. And I can personally vouch that the views are spectacular!

From there, we went over to Point State Park. The massive fountain at the point (the site of Fort Duquesne, built by the French in 1754 where the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers join to form the Ohio) had been under construction in recent years and just reopened. I remember spending time at this park as a kid. The Three Rivers Arts Fest is held there, as well as the Three Rivers Regatta, the largest inland regatta in the U.S.

After that, we drove to Pittsburgh’s redeveloped North Shore, which was a neat area for me to check out. It’s the site of Heinz Field and PNC Park, neither of which I’ve been to. (When I last lived in the ‘burgh, games were played at the now demolished Three Rivers Stadium). The North Shore has a fun river walk area with boat tie ups and restaurants. We ate at Jerome Bettis’ Grille 36 and loved it. The waitress kindly overlooked that my youngest colored the football player’s jersey on the kids menu purple and black (Baltimore Ravens colors, instead of Steelers colors… not sure what The Bus would have thought. 😀 )

I ordered a Pittsburgh favorite of mine: steak salad. Native Pittsburghers know how to do steak salad right. It isn’t a few beef tips served over an adorable handful of vinaigrette-laced field greens. Nope. The calorie conscious need not apply. The Grille 36 steak salad is one of the best I’ve had: a mountain of lettuce topped with filet tips, corn, tomatoes, blue cheese crumbles and melted cheddar cheese, French fries and fried onion rings. Served with a very generous cup of Ranch dressing.

My friend and I capped the night off by sitting on her huge wrap around farm-house porch catching up and watching the kids catch fireflies. Awesome summer fun!

OTHER WRITING RELATED STUFF

Veronica Scott, a contributor to USA Today’s HEA column has been doing a fun summer feature. She’s asking authors (including me!) to talk about their favorite sf/f TV shows and movies. Check out our answers here and here.

Night Owl Reviews Top PickWhite Heart of Justice is a Night Owls Reviews Top Pick!

“Archer has a gift of creating characters with depth, growth and confidence that will leave all urban fantasy lovers wanting more… [L]ots of action, which I just tore through in record time. I was hooked from the beginning.” — Night Owl Reviews

Who’s Got Mail?

MailI love connecting with everyone online, of course, but it’s equally great to receive mail through good ole U.S.P.S. Send me something interesting this summer (a postcard, a picture, a drawing…)

Jill Archer
P.O. Box 381
Shrewsbury, PA 17361-0381

WHAT ELSE HAVE I BEEN UP TO?

Among other things, I’m working on a novella featuring Ari Carmine and Nocturo Onyx. Almost half of the rough draft is finished. If I like how it looks after it’s done, I’ll self-publish it. I’m excited about it because, as some of you know, I’ve been blathering on for a year or more now about how I should learn the indie side of things. I’ve also always wanted to do something featuring Night. He’s a fascinating character, capable of supporting his own series even. And the novella will also (hopefully) be a nice springboard into a probable Noon Onyx B4! 😀

In Other News

I celebrated my birthday last week. (I don’t usually make a big deal of my birthday online, but I do love to celebrate milestones both big and small.) My older daughter made and decorated a beautiful cake for me (did I mention she loves Next Great Baker?)

“MADE OF GUARANTEED, CERTIFIED STRICTLY GRADE-A PEPPERMINT CUCUMBER SAUSAGE-PASTE BUTTER!” — Dr. Seuss’ Happy Birthday to You! (Party Edition)

Beautiful birthday cake
[Editor’s note: no peppermint cucumber sausage-paste butter was used in the making of this cake]
And then we went to see How To Train Your Dragon 2, which I loved! It was fun seeing Hiccup, Toothless, and the gang five years later and the film had enough surprises to keep the story feeling fresh. Luckily, the only thing I’d read before seeing it was an article on how the animators aged up Hiccup’s appearance so none of the movie’s big reveals were spoiled for me. Yes, parts of it are sad. And some of the characters made big mistakes in the past or make them in the movie. But plot points like that are a part of good storytelling. People aren’t perfect and characters that reflect that are more interesting and allow for greater emotional highs and lows.

So who’s this handsome guy? It’s Reggie masquerading as Toothless (am I Picasso-with-a-virtual-paintbrush or what? 😀 )

So that’s a wrap for June! Tomorrow — to kick off July — Jennifer Harlow’s guest blogging about her steampunk romance, Verity Hart vs. The Vampyres.

What’s up with you? What are you working on? Vacations? New WIPs? TV show, movie, or book recommendations? Whatever you’re up to, I hope everyone is having a terrific Summer 2014!

The Chesapeake Bay is a 4,480 Acre “Water Park”

St. Michael’s Lighthouse

Usually when you think of water parks, you think of slippery slides, wave pools, and raging man-made rivers. Those kind of parks are fun, but there are natural water parks all over — ya know, they’re called lakes, rivers, and bays. 😉 My favorite? Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay.

My in-laws keep a small motor boat docked on the Eastern Shore. Earlier this summer, we took a boat ride from Kent Narrows to St. Michael’s. It’s a ride we’ve taken many times, but it’s easy and enjoyable — an almost straight shot south across Eastern Bay that allows you to enjoy both the bay and the quaint and utterly charming town of St. Michael’s, Maryland.

Chesapeake Bay is a Boat Lovers Paradise

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the area, the Chesapeake Bay offers some of the best boating in America. It’s the largest estuary in the U.S. Two hundred miles long and, at its widest, 30 miles across — the bay’s total shoreline (including tributaries) is over 11,600 miles! You could spend every weekend for the rest of your life exploring each of its nooks and crannies and I still don’t think you’d find them all. Luckily, you only need a day to have fun on the bay.

Kent Narrows & Dock Bars

The Bay Bridge spans the Chesapeake Bay from just outside Annapolis to Kent Island, a large island that is separated from the Delmarva Peninsula by no more than the narrowest strip of water — a continuously dredged channel that connects the Chester River to Eastern Bay. “The Narrows” is full of boats and bars (okay, there’s food and fuel too :-)). When we were younger, my husband and I spent a considerable portion of many of our weekends at those bars. The music was loud, the drinks plentiful, and you could always walk “home” — to your boat! 😀 (We’ve now settled into calmer weekend rhythms, but I sometimes miss those late nights out!)

Red Eyes Dock Bar in Kent Narrows
This is what we miss when we fly into Bay Bridge Airport (a tiny, un-towered strip to the right of Bay Bridge as you cross onto the Eastern Shore) — TRAFFIC! This traffic isn’t even that bad. As any Marylander can tell you, the Bay Bridge can be bumper-to-bumper during summer weekends!

St. Michael’s, Maryland

Patriotic View from the Town Dock

St. Michael’s is a historic town dating back to colonial times. The place is full of charming cottages, beautiful boats, churches, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, and lots of great restaurants. We ate lunch at the Town Dock. I spontaneously and sentimentally ordered a Pimm’s Cup (thinking of the ones I used to drink at the Napoleon House in New Orleans), but either my palate has changed or adding lemonade really does make a difference. (Anyone else a fan of the Pimm’s Cup? Have any tips on how to make a good one?) In any case, the Town Dock’s waterfront deck views were sunny and sparkling and it was nice to just sit in the shade, watching the boats in the harbor. Later, we took a leisurely stroll through town.

The Crab Claw in St. Michael’s is another great place to eat. Crabs, beer, and boats… What could be better?

Want to know what else to do in St. Michael’s? Here’s a list of 50 Free Things!

Other Chesapeake Bay Options

If you’re not up for docking and eating, another option is to pack a picnic and beach your boat on a sandy spot. My kids love jumping off the boat into the water and playing in the sand. I usually opt for lounging with a book.

Nice sandy spots are popular!
On the way back, you can look for osprey nests…
Watch the sunset…
Or just blow bubbles at the marina…

Want to know more about the Chesapeake Bay (as well as where I got my facts from)? Click here and here.

So readers, how about you? Have you ever been on the Chesapeake Bay? If so, what’s your favorite thing to do there? Do you like to go boating? Where’s your favorite place? Have you visited the Eastern Shore? Would you like to? Do you still blow bubbles? Watch the sunset? Eat crabs? Love a good Pimm’s Cup? Whatever your plans are for the weekend — Enjoy!

What Will You Do With Your Kids This Summer? 5 Possible Management Approaches

Get to work, girls! 😉

This summer will be the first summer that I’ll be writing under contract with my elementary school kids at home with me. Sound like a recipe for disaster? I hope not! Like most things, I’m trying to approach the situation with humor and an open mind. So I thought I’d write a post about it and see if there are any ways of dealing with this situation that I may have missed. Here are five possible approaches to my problem:

Cinderella’s Step-Mom Approach

Looking around my house, I see plenty of chores that haven’t been tended to. My fingers practically twitch with the desire to write a twenty page, two-hundred-hours-to-complete to do list for my wee ones. They can either pretend to be working amongst cockroaches, rats, pigeons, and flies (a la Amy Adams in Enchanted) or they can take the more traditional approach and imagine their work buddies are mice, birds, squirrels, and chipmunks. In fact, I’m sure we have some dresses and dusting wands around here somewhere…

The Parent Trap (a.k.a. Ship Them Off to Camp) Approach

If you have young girls, you’ve likely seen (many times over!) 1998’s The Parent Trap. (In fact, if you are of a certain age, you’ve probably also seen its predecessor, the 1961 version). In the more recent version, young and adorable Lindsay Lohan plays the twins, who are shipped off to summer camp by their divorced parents. I’m here to admit that, even if you are still married and there are two parents in the house to help manage the summer schedule, the thought of a summer resident camp is mighty appealing! (That said, I compromised on this approach and chose a few awesome sounding day camps for them to attend).

The White Flag (i.e. Enlist Grandma’s Help) Approach

Do you have family that lives close by? Luckily for me, my mother-in-law lives only 2 states and a 2 1/2 hour drive away. When mulling over my summer options, I quickly decided this was the perfect distance for my kids to travel in order to try out staying away from home for a week (in a loving, safe, sugar-laden 😉 environment). My in-laws have a pool and my MIL loves to bake. Plus their neighborhood has an ice cream truck that drives around their streets at night whereas ours does not. *I* still get excited when I hear the ice cream bell. So how can I deny them the chance to eat a week’s worth of Sponge Bob, Shrek, and Scooby Doo popsicles?

If You Can’t Beat ‘Em, Join ‘Em Approach

Writers need inspiration! We need new experiences, new places, new people in order to be at our creative best! When I look around at the myriad fun options available over a summer to families everywhere, I am determined to join in. If anyone reading this is a regular reader, you know that I need to supplement my writing with other activities to keep it fresh. Stale, regurgitated, monotonous, robotic drivel is what I would produce if I couldn’t get out of my house and into the woods. Or if I couldn’t go to a museum, amusement park, bowling alley, movie theater… take a road trip, go boating or bike riding, fly to the beach, hit the bookstore or library… Take a vacation, visit family and friends.

The Suck It Up and Stop Bellyaching Approach

No one twisted my arm and told me I had to be a writer. (And many writers are holding down full-time jobs in addition to their writing careers). Same goes for being a mom. Having kids makes getting things done ten times harder than it was without. But you know what? I wouldn’t have it any other way. I am a writer and a mother because, even though it’s a lot of work — I LOVE IT!!!

How about you? Will you have young kids at home this summer? How do you make it work? Are any of these approaches your favored way of coping? Or do you have another option to recommend? What are YOUR plans for the summer? 😀