fantasy romance, Jeffe Kennedy, Twelve Kingdowns, The Crown of the Queen

Jeffe Kennedy: “Grateful I couldn’t selfpub easily” (#amrevising #writerslife)

The speed at which one can self-publish is often mentioned as one of its biggest advantages. A writer can get a book to market via self-pub MUCH faster than via traditional publication. But fast isn’t always best. If the mantra of real estate is location, location, location then the mantra of writers should be revision, revision, revision. Both rising star and hard-working author (those two adjectives are hardly a coincidence; they go hand in hand), Jeffe Kennedy, is here to share her thoughts on drafting versus revision and why all of us should take the time to get it right. Welcome, Jeffe!


One of the best parts of being a writer, I often say, is getting to have in-depth conversations with writers I admire. At the RT Booklovers Convention in Las Vegas, I had lunch with amazing SFF author Kate Elliott. Not only is she a brilliant author of some of my favorite fantasy series, she’s been in the business for over twenty years and generously shares her accumulated wisdom.

At any rate, during lunch, as we talked about our current projects, she asked me if I love or hate revising. This is one of those litmus test questions writers often ask each other, because most of us fall into one of two camps on it. I always say I hate it. For me, revising has always given me the sense of fixing the things I got wrong the first time I wrote it. In contrast, one of my good writer friends calls revision “God’s work.” Which I find amusing because, biblically speaking, God didn’t do much revising at all. Unless you count Lilith as the first draft of woman and Eve as the revision.

Kate falls into the revision camp. She hates drafting and feels she really shines when revising. What she hates are the ups and downs of drafting, the going from exaltation to utter despondency. As we discussed the ins and outs of both phases of writing, it occurred to me that maybe I’ve changed.

Because I really don’t hate revision as much as I used to. Largely because that feeling of fixing mistakes has diminished considerably.

I wouldn’t go so far as saying that it feels like God’s work, but revising gives me the opportunity to make the story better. Learning to relish the revision process has also taken the pressure off of drafting for me. I don’t have to get everything right on the first draft, because I can retool it later.

Finally, I think I’ve changed my feelings on this for two more reasons: I’ve grown as a writer and I’ve grown as a human being.

Seriously, I think I’m a better writer than I used to be (which is a huge relief), and because of that, I’m stretching more. I’m taking on bigger story challenges, which means that revising gives me sometimes much-needed opportunities to dig in.

Also, and this was the big revelation: I think I’ve matured into this place. A lot of that “revision is just fixing mistakes” feeling comes from me being a perfectionist and from me being impatient – two of my greatest flaws. I’ve never liked having to labor over a task. I want it to be perfect, yes, but I also want it to be perfect right out of the gate. Because I’m rational enough to know that nothing is ever perfect, I’ve managed to disengage a lot of that particular expectation, but it’s always seemed that the price I pay is still wanting it to be wonderful the moment I finish.

But not so much anymore. I still want the book to be as wonderful as it can be, but I have much more patience these days for working and reworking until it is. I don’t feel the same pressure of vanishing time that I used to.

Maybe that comes from being older, or from being farther along in my career. Regardless, it’s a better place to be.

I often reflect on how grateful I am that self-publishing was not so easy, acceptable and readily available when I was shopping my first novel. I revised that sucker numerous times because I felt forced to. If I wanted to sell that book to a publisher, I had to find ways to make it better. If I’d been able to publish it myself, I would not have put myself through that pain. And it is a much better book. Though not as good as I’d make it now, if I could go back and revise. I cringe a little when someone says they’re reading that first novel, but nothing like I would if they read that first version I hugged and cuddled like a precious baby – and lacked the perspective to recognize just how bad it was.

Perspective that also now allows me to value the revision process in a way I never could before.

So, though I’ll still answer the question that I love drafting more, I also don’t hate revision the way I used to. Which is kind of a cool place to be.

What about you all – Team Drafting or Team Revision?


This was such a great post and so timely for me! Here are a few of my thoughts:

  1. I’m Team Drafting: While I definitely understand the value of revision (I think its presence/absence can make or break a book), I much prefer drafting. The story feels immediate and real. Yes, the “exultation to utter despondency” can be emotionally draining, but I prefer riding the roller coaster to reviewing its engineering plans. Revision, for me, always requires bird’s- eye view to microscopic… big picture to itty, bitty and back again… It’s enough to give me a migraine.
  2. I probably feel that way because I’m currently revising Pocket Full of Tinder. 😀
  3. I’ve talked before about the pressure writers feel to produce more work faster so I’m not going to belabor that point again, but I think it’s related to Jeffe’s post. I absolutely agree with her — revision is ESSENTIAL. Don’t rush to publish. And yet I understand why some writers would want to. You hear a lot about FOMO these days (“fear of missing out”). Whenever I read those articles or posts, my gut reaction is to scoff. “Yeah, right,” I think. “Like I’d ever feel like I’m missing out. I’m doing exactly what I want to be doing.” … … … But I realized the other day that I *do* experience FOMO. Maybe not with respect to social events or life experiences or keeping up with every little bit of online info but with respect to PUBLISHING. So, yeah, ye writers in the starting gate who are kicking at the door — I get you.
  4. I envy writers like Jeffe who seem to grow more and more confident with each book. For me, I feel like each one is as tough as the last, just in different ways.
  5. But you know what they say: if it was easy, everyone would do it. ANYONE can click a “publish” button these days. But not everyone can write a quality novel. Don’t be the person that just clicks a button. Take the hard road. You’ll be in great company! 🙂

fantasy romance, Jeffe Kennedy, Twelve Kingdowns, The Crown of the Queen

The Crown of the Queen

A Twelve Kingdoms Novella

Dafne Mailloux, librarian and temporary babysitter to the heirs to the High Throne of the Twelve – now Thirteen – Kingdoms, finds it difficult to leave the paradise of Annfwn behind. Particularly that trove of rare books in temptingly unfamiliar languages. But duty calls, and hers is to the crown. It’s not like her heart belongs elsewhere. But how can she crown a queen who hesitates to take the throne?

This novella will be part of a duology called For Crown and Kingdom, which will also contain a novella by Grace Draven called The Undying King

For Crown and Kingdom (The Crown of the Queen) will release on May 31, 2016 and will be available in digital format and print.

Buy links will be added to the bookpage once available: http://www.jeffekennedy.com/for-crown-and-kingdom/

More on Jeffe

Jeffe Kennedy is an award-winning author whose works include non-fiction, poetry, short fiction, and novels. She has been a Ucross Foundation Fellow, received the Wyoming Arts Council Fellowship for Poetry, and was awarded a Frank Nelson Doubleday Memorial Award. Her essays have appeared in many publications, including Redbook.

Her most recent works include a number of fiction series: the fantasy romance novels of A Covenant of Thorns; the contemporary BDSM novellas of the Facets of Passion, and an erotic contemporary serial novel, Master of the Opera. A fourth series, the fantasy trilogy The Twelve Kingdoms, hit the shelves starting in May 2014 and book 1, The Mark of the Tala, received a starred Library Journal review was nominated for the RT Book of the Year while the sequel, The Tears of the Rose was nominated for the RT Reviewers’ Choice Best Fantasy Romance of 2014 and the third book, The Talon of the Hawk, won the RT Reviewers’ Choice Best Fantasy Romance of 2015. Two more books will follow in this world, beginning with The Pages of the Mind May 2016. A fifth series, the erotic romance trilogy, Falling Under, started with Going Under, and was followed by Under His Touch and Under Contract.

She lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, with two Maine coon cats, plentiful free-range lizards and a very handsome Doctor of Oriental Medicine.

Jeffe can be found online at her website: JeffeKennedy.com, every Sunday at the popular Word Whores blog, on Facebook, on Goodreads and pretty much constantly on Twitter @jeffekennedy. She is represented by Connor Goldsmith of Fuse Literary.

* Jeffe also gets the award for Most Links In A Bio. 😀 😀 😀

Writers, what about you? Which is your favorite — drafting or revision? Do you regret mistakes in earlier works? Wish you could go back and change them? Thank you, Jeffe, for guest blogging today. Best wishes for The Crown of the Queen!

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Jeffe Kennedy: A Personal History of an Emerging Genre (#fantasy #romance)

Today’s guest blogger is Jeffe Kennedy, who, among other recent successes, finaled in this year’s PRISM (FF&P’s published author contest) in the Fantasy category. She’s here to discuss how popular fantasy romance is these days..

I’ve just returned from the RT Booklovers Convention and – wow! – was it ever a great year for Fantasy Romance.

A number of us hosted the Mad Hatter Fantasy Romance Tea Party. We planned for 100 people, something like 150 came in for standing room only, and RT volunteers turned 30+ away. Next year RT suggests we plan for 200! What a rousing – and unexpected – success. I saw other signs of increased interest in the genre, with people snapping up my books, some after standing for hours in line! I’ve never experienced anything like it.

In fact, I had a long, winding (two-hour) conversation with Fantasy Romance author Grace Draven. It was fascinating to compare notes with her, because she was similarly blown away by the genre love. She said that, like me, she’s never been on the upsurge of anything in her life. We are both bemused and incredibly grateful.

What’s most interesting is our shared history, though we only just met at this conference.

Her book, Master of Crows – which was my Grace Draven gateway drug and I love, love, love – came out from Amber Quill in 2009. She told me it didn’t do well, largely because the cover wasn’t good. When she regained her rights to the book, she reissued it in 2011 with an amazing new cover and it took off from there. Meanwhile, my first book in the Covenant of Thorns trilogy, Rogue’s Pawn, finally sold after much muttering about how cross-genre it was, and came out from Carina Press in 2012. I think it’s salient that Grace and I both sold these “unmarketable” books to digital presses. We both reflected on our gratitude for those digital presses and the technology that allows these cross-genre books to find audiences, which allows new genres to emerge.

Amber Quill called Grace’s book Fantasy, but Carina classified mine, three years later, as Fantasy Romance – a genre I had never heard defined that way, before that moment. But in between the first publication of Master of Crows and mine for Rogue’s Pawn, something else happened. C.L. Wilson’s Lord of the Fading Lands was published in July 2010 by Harper Collins and debuted on the New York Times bestseller list. She, as Grace puts it, kicked the door down for Fantasy Romance.

This year, RT Magazine awarded the first of my Twelve Kingdoms books, The Mark of the Tala, the Seal of Excellence for stretching genre boundaries. The second book, The Tears of the Rose, was nominated for best Fantasy Romance of the year, along with books by C.L. Wilson and Amy Raby, and Grace’s book, Entreat Me, won the category. 2014 was the first time the magazine gave awards in the subgenre.

So, what’s ahead? I’m a big believer that a high tide floats all boats. More love for Fantasy Romance means more opportunities for writers! Bring it on, people!

the talon of the hawk

More About The Talon of the Hawk

A HEAVY CROWN

Three daughters were born to High King Uorsin, in place of the son he wanted. The youngest, lovely and sweet. The middle, pretty and subtle, with an air of magic. And the eldest, the Heir. A girl grudgingly honed to leadership, not beauty, to bear the sword and honor of the king.

Ursula’s loyalty is as ingrained as her straight warrior’s spine. She protects the peace of the Twelve Kingdoms with sweat and blood, her sisters from threats far and near. And she protects her father to prove her worth. But she never imagined her loyalty would become an open question on palace grounds. That her father would receive her with a foreign witch at one side and a hireling captain at the other—that soldiers would look on her as a woman, not as a warrior. She also never expected to decide the destiny of her sisters, of her people, of the Twelve Kingdoms and the Thirteenth. Not with her father still on the throne and war in the air. But the choice is before her. And the Heir must lead…

Available at Amazon   BN

Jeffe Kennedy
Jeffe Kennedy

More About Jeffe

Jeffe Kennedy is an award-winning author whose works include non-fiction, poetry, short fiction, and novels. She has been a Ucross Foundation Fellow, received the Wyoming Arts Council Fellowship for Poetry, and was awarded a Frank Nelson Doubleday Memorial Award. Her essays have appeared in many publications, including Redbook.

Her most recent works include a number of fiction series: the fantasy romance novels of A Covenant of Thorns; the contemporary BDSM novellas of the Facets of Passion, and an erotic  contemporary serial novel, Master of the Opera. A fourth series, the fantasy trilogy The Twelve Kingdoms, hit the shelves starting in May 2014 and book 1, The Mark of the Tala, received a starred Library Journal review and has been nominated for the RT Book of the Year while the sequel, The Tears of the Rose, has been nominated for best fantasy romance of the year. A fifth series, the highly anticipated erotic romance trilogy, Falling Under, released starting with Going Under, followed by Under His Touch and Under Contract.

She lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, with two Maine coon cats, plentiful free-range lizards and a very handsome Doctor of Oriental Medicine.

Jeffe can be found online at her website: JeffeKennedy.com, every Sunday at the popular Word Whores blog, on Facebook, and pretty much constantly on Twitter @jeffekennedy. She is represented by Connor Goldsmith of Fuse Literary.

Thanks for guest blogging today, Jeffe, and congratulations! It sounds like RT Booklovers Convention was a lot of fun. 😀

WHAT’S UP WITH ME FOR 2015 (#Writing Life and #Reader Appreciation)

Enough of you have checked in about what’s next for Noon (and possibly Night) that I figured I’d just do a post that I could refer to when answering.

My 2015 plans are still somewhat in play. But here are a few things I’m working on:

A SUPER SECRET NEW PROJECT

Ok, it’s not 100% secret bc I mentioned it when I did my release day party for White Heart of Justice. This project is my YA duology. It’s a two book “series” – no more, no less. I’ve got the whole thing plotted out, start to finish, and am currently slogging my way through the first draft of book #1. I think it’s a really cool, fun, creative, amazing project, but I’m admittedly biased. 🙂 Ideally, I’d like to find a traditional publishing partner for it. So that’s why I can’t say much else about it now.

THE NOON ONYX SERIES

There will be at least two more books. In a perfect world, I would release the fourth book myself sometime in 2015 – and that’s my goal. If I’m lucky enough to find a home for my YA deuce, however, then I’ll need to prioritize that. While this might be disappointing to some Noon fans, I’m hoping you/they will understand why I would prioritize “guaranteed money in” (an advance) versus “initial money out” (self-pub).

That said, Noon fans are owed a bit more news than this. So what else can I share?

When I finished WHOJ, I was at a crossroads. I wasn’t even sure I wanted to continue the series. Some of you suggested that I write a novella to wrap things up. And this was a great suggestion. I love hearing from readers, especially readers who care enough about the series to share specific thoughts. But in for a penny, in for a pound and all that. When I started writing the series, I envisioned seven books. I’m not sure it will end up being as long as that, but a novella won’t give me enough room to tell what’s left to tell. So… my intent for now is to write two more.

What about Nightshade?

I haven’t forgotten about him and I hope you haven’t either. I’ve mentioned doing something with him for years. He is a great character with lots of potential. In 2015, readers will get either a short story or a novella, depending on how long it is when it’s done. Here’s the blurb:


 

PORTENT OF LOVE… AND DANGER

SCARLET AUGUR

A NIGHTSHADE NOVELLA

Nocturo “Nightshade” Onyx has the sinister looks of a Maegester but the soft, healing magic of a Mederi. Eighteen months ago he joined the progressive Demeter Tribe so that he could hone his skills. He now wields surgical scalpels, defensive daggers, and waxing magic with ease. But his greatest challenges are still to come: trapping an injured demon and capturing a young woman’s heart.

Aceraceae “Acer” Feldspar’s healing magic only works on one person: her. Losing her mother at the age of seven to a disease she couldn’t cure, she was determined to find a way to use her magic to help others. Now, at nineteen, Acer protects her tribe’s perimeter. But the intrusion of a scarlet augur – demon harbinger of passion, pain, and tumultuous change – threatens far more than Acer’s pride.

 HE WANTS TO HEAL IT; SHE WANTS TO KILL IT

ONLY ONE THING IS CERTAIN:

WORKING TOGETHER WON’T BE EASY


 

From SCARLET AUGUR, Chapter 1:

The blackbird lilies were well and truly black instead of their natural brilliant red. Every part of the flowers – leaves, stems, calyces, and corollas – seemed to thrum with dark waves of infrasound. But Night knew it was just the absence of color he was sensing rather than sound. These plants looked dead, which was extraordinary considering where they’d been cultivated: Demeter’s third largest greenhouse. Frowning, he set his watering can down amongst some martagons and crouched down for a closer look.

Nightshade’s given name – Nocturo Onyx – and his grim, foreboding looks belied his medic profession. Kneeling in the dirt between two wooden tables loaded with zinnias and orchids, he looked like a Haljan impossibility: the love child of bloodthirsty Bellona, Patron Demoness of War, and virile Vervactor, Patron Demon of the Plough. He wore a loose linen shirt, soiled with fresh dirt and rolled up at the sleeves, with a puce-colored kilt and filthy, steel-toed, worn leather boots. Strapped to his left arm and right leg were two small knives: the short, but deadly sharp, pugiones that many of Demeter’s Mederies carried.

The sun had barely begun to rise, but under the glass, it felt like midday. Night rubbed the back of his neck, which was already wet with sweat – Luck, how he hated the greenhouse! – and thought about what the blackening might mean.

The sweltering summer heat ruled out a furnace failure or frost as the cause.

Mold?

Maybe. But if so, it was unlike any mold that Night had ever seen.

This was no mottled splash of sage, smoke, ochre, or ink. Instead, the blackening was preternaturally uniform, as if the lilies had been carved out of lead, dipped in nacreous pitch… or brushed with waning magic.

Nightshade reached out toward the closest lily, catching the tip of one of its black petals between his thumb and index finger. Immediately, his first impression – that the blackened greenery was giving off some sort of subsonic hum – intensified. His arm throbbed but instead of pulling his hand back, he sent a pulse of waxing magic from his fingers into the petal in an attempt to coax any latent life back to an active, healthy state. But Night’s waxing magic pulse instantly mirrored telling him that the plant’s organic compounds had already begun to break down. His magic was powerful enough to bring simple organisms back from the brink of death, but even he couldn’t bring something back to life after it had passed into its next stage of existence: decay.

He sighed and stood, glancing around the humid interior of the greenhouse. Though the possible causes of death were few, it was still hard to accept that waning magic had killed the lilies. There were only two kinds of waning magic users in Halja: Maegesters and demons. The former were human, the latter were shapeshifting beasts, but neither of them were often seen in Maize.

Night pulled a small wooden box out of the sporran hanging from his waist. He withdrew his shorter pugio from its sheath, deadheaded one of the lilies, and placed its top in the box. Later, he would prepare a few slides for his microscope. If some new type of fungus killed these plants, Linnaea, the tribe’s monarch, would want to know.

And if it had been a demon… well, the best that could be said was that it hadn’t been intentional. Otherwise, every single plant in the greenhouse would be dead.


Nocturo Onyx, Nightshade, Scarlet Augur, Jill Archer
“She had only one vulnerability – and it wasn’t demons.
It was Nocturo Onyx.”
– Acer Feldspar
Acer Feldspar, Scarlet Augur, Jill Archer
“Pretty as a milkmaid, but instead of carrying a pail,
Acer wore mail.”
– Nocturo Onyx

DREAM, INTERRUPTED

Yes, I can understand if you’re just a wee bit tired of hearing about this project. It’s only 13,500 words and yet I’ve done at least a few posts about it. Why? Well, I never did a blog tour for it bc it’s just a short story/novelette and yet I had things to share and say. In fact, you’ve likely not heard the last about it because I hope to make an audio version of it. I think it’s a story that would be well suited to that medium so it’s something I want to explore. For now, all I can say is working with my cover designer to create a cover for it has been FUN.

book cover, mock-up, Dream Interrupted, Jill Archer, dark fantasy, Corelei Neverest, gothic romance, mystery
MOCK-UP COVER FOR
STAND-ALONE VERSION OF
DREAM, INTERRUPTED

OTHER STUFF

There’s more?! Well, not in 2015. But I’ve got two other adult fantasy series ideas that I haven’t yet developed into proposals. Depending on how the first half of 2015 goes, I may move them forward. I’d love to work with my Ace editor from the Noon Onyx series again. I’m committed to trying to be a hybrid author.

So let the juggling of projects begin! Thank you to each and every one of you who have contacted me via various channels to inquire about what’s next. Stay tuned…

Jeffe Kennedy: The Future of Fantasy Romance

Jeffe Kennedy’s third book in her Covenant of Thorns trilogy releases today. She’s here to chat about the fantasy romance genre and share a bit about her new book, Rogue’s Paradise. Welcome, Jeffe!

“It’s not easy for writers to know what genre to put their stories in”

Thanks to Jill for hosting me today, on the release day of Rogue’s Paradise!

Jill and I are both members of RWA’s Fantasy, Futuristic and Paranormal special interest chapter (FFP). We’ve been having a lively discussion on our chapter loop lately about genre and how to categorize our own books.

This kind of question comes up fairly frequently, particularly from newer writers wondering how to describe their books in query letters or in choosing genre categories in self-publishing. Contrary to what you might think, it’s not easy for writers to know what genre to put their stories in. We generally write the stories and THEN figure out what to call it. Jill also writes what she calls “genre-bending fantasy.”

That said, it’s interesting to me to have this trilogy culminate at a time when the genre, Fantasy Romance, is considered “hot.” At the risk of sounding like I’m groaning out an old, sad tale about walking to school in hip-deep snow, uphill, both ways , when I wrote the first book, Rogue’s Pawn, Fantasy Romance wasn’t really a genre. Certainly not one I was aware of.

I know this because for a long time, I shopped that book as Urban Fantasy or Paranormal Romance. And it was politely explained to me (sometimes less so, as one agent sent me away in tears) that it was neither. When Carina Press bought the Covenant of Thorns trilogy, they called it Fantasy Romance. I swear that was the first time I was aware of the genre, though I had been reading other books classified that way. Rogue’s Pawn was only the tenth book at Carina to be published in that genre, in July of 2012, just over two years after Carina launched their first books.

Now, with Rogue’s Possession, the second book in the trilogy, finaling in FFP’s PRISM contest (though as Fantasy – even WE don’t recognize Fantasy Romance as a separate category yet!), and Rogue’s Paradise coming out today, I often hear my Covenant of Thorns trilogy cited as “classic” fantasy romance. Or, at least, as a solid example of the genre.

In our discussions on the FFP loop, I described myself as an interdimensional being who straddles genres, (we get to talk that way in FFP) especially since my other current trilogy is called Fantasy. One of our other members suggested the term “interstitial genres” – which, if you know biology, is a great choice. It would be interesting to trace the history of which books were first dubbed “Fantasy Romance.” Amusingly the Wikipedia link for Fantasy Romance redirects to Romantic Fantasy (last updated August 2014) – not the same thing at all.

At any rate, it’s so fun to have this trilogy culminate at this time, with so many wonderful writers doing great things with fantasy stories in all types of settings and romantic flavors.

It feels like a big party.

~throws confetti~

~twirls~

Jill’s Thoughts:

Every time these discussions come up about subgenre definition, I think of the last scene from Back to the Future when Doc says, “Roads? Where we’re going, we don’t need roads.” lol.

Ah, if only it were that simple.

 I’m always tempted to call the Noon Onyx books “Fantasy” (which is what the spine says they are) and be done with it, but I also know it’s important to give readers information to help them decide if they want to read a book. And the fewer words a writer uses to do that, the better. So labels and genre definitions can be helpful. But they can also be limiting and misleading.

My books are genre mutts, full of fantasy (they’re set in an imaginary world), urban fantasy (the focus of the stories is the main character, a magic-wielding woman), and romance elements (there are several suitors and lots of emotion and inner conflict regarding Noon’s relationships). And, because the stories are written in the youthful, first person voice of a twenty-something postgrad, I even played around with the New Adult label. Plus each book in the series has drawn from the well of these other genres: mystery, adventure/quest, and legal thriller. Gah! See why I want to call up Doc and borrow his DeLorean?

Jeffe mentioned these discussions regarding subgenre definition come up fairly frequently among writers. Yep, too true. But, even though I joke about calling up Doc, I love discussing this stuff. In fact, just last week I was swapping emails with some of the writers who will be doing the Dark Fantasy Panel with me at the upcoming Baltimore Book Fest. Betcha can guess what one of the things we were discussing was. Yep, the future of dark fantasy and what the heck that label is supposed to mean. 😀

More About Rogue’s Paradise

Rogue's ParadisePregnant, possessed, and in love with a man I don’t dare to trust-those are the consequences of the risks I took to save my life. But Faerie, the land of blood and magic, is filled with bitter ironies, and the bargains I made now threaten me and my unborn child.

The darkly sensual fae noble Rogue still tempts me to danger and desire. As we await the birth of our child, I’ve been forced to question whether our offspring is part of a bargain Rogue once made to save himself. He can’t tell me the truth due to a spell the vicious Queen Titania has him under. Would he betray our family against his will? Could I ever forgive him if he does?

Rogue insists on an eternal commitment from me, even as Titania’s forces close in on us. I don’t know if Rogue and I can withstand her onslaught, or that of the beast within me. But I will not stop looking for answers-even if it brings the walls of Faerie crashing down.

 More About Jeffe

Jeffe KennedyJeffe Kennedy is an award-winning author with a writing career that spans decades. Her works include non-fiction, poetry, short fiction, and novels. She has been a Ucross Foundation Fellow, received the Wyoming Arts Council Fellowship for Poetry, and was awarded a Frank Nelson Doubleday Memorial Award. Her essays have appeared in many publications, including Redbook.

Her most recent works include a number of fiction series: the fantasy romance novels of A Covenant of Thorns;  the contemporary BDSM novellas of the Facets of Passion, and an erotic  contemporary serial novel, Master of the Opera, which released beginning January 2, 2014. A fourth series, the fantasy trilogy The Twelve Kingdoms, hit the shelves starting in May 2014 and a fifth, the highly anticipated erotic romance trilogy, Falling Under, will release starting in July.

She lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, with two Maine coon cats, plentiful free-range lizards and a very handsome Doctor of Oriental Medicine.

Jeffe can be found online at her website: JeffeKennedy.com, every Sunday at the popular Word Whores blog, on Facebook, and pretty much constantly on Twitter @jeffekennedy. She is represented by Foreword Literary.

What sort of stories do you think of when you hear the term “fantasy romance”? Have you read any books that would fit that description? In addition to Jeffe’s Covenant of Thorns trilogy, two authors to try might be C.L. Wilson and Amy Raby.

Congratulations and best wishes, Jeffe. Thank you for guest blogging today!

Rogues Paradise Banner

What to Read & Watch: 3 Fantasy Books and 2 Science Fiction Movies

Today, a few thoughts on the books I’ve been reading and the movies I’ve been watching, and then Thursday 8/15/13 Suzanne Johnson is guest blogging about her latest release in her “Sentinels of New Orleans Series” – ELYSIAN FIELDS. There will be chances to win some GREAT PRIZES (including an iPad 2!) so be sure to stop by again tomorrow.

Assassin’s Gambit

(Fantasy Romance)

I found this title because Amy and I connected online and the story intrigued me. (Click here for her guest post on “Brainy Heroes”). The plot was almost equally divided between the romance between Vitala (a Caturanga champion and deadly assassin) and Lucien (a charismatic amputee emperor) and a coup d’état and the war that follows. Vitala and Lucien were unique and memorable and their path to happiness full of enough bumps and hurdles to keep me turning the pages. The secondary characters were interesting too (loved Flavia!). The second book in the series focuses on the romance between Rhianne (Lucien’s cousin, a mind mage) and Jan-Torres (a foreign prince). I can’t help wondering if Celeste (Lucien’s sister) or Ista (another assassin) will get their HEA’s in future books. Amy will have to let us know! 🙂

Generation V

(Urban Fantasy)

I found this book because I read Brennan’s post during the Supernatural Smack Down event that my character Noon Onyx participated in. The voice of her character, Fortitude Scott, immediately captured my attention (click here for Fort’s Smack Down post) and made me laugh and I thought, “I just have to read this.” Brennan’s writing style is terrific and her vampires feel fresh and new (even though most of them are ancient). Half the reason I was turning the pages in the beginning was to learn more about the character and the world he lived in. He made me laugh, he made me feel sorry for him, and he made me root for him. There are some dark parts to the story, but urban fantasy readers are prepared for dark. Those parts of the story are well-balanced by the humor. I loved Suzume, the trickster kitsune who is Fort’s body-guard, life coach, and partner in crime. The ending nicely wrapped up loose ends while leaving plenty of room for Fort to grow and take on new challenges. I’m definitely looking forward to the second book, Iron Night!

House Of Shadows

(Fantasy)

I already posted a bit about this already. Just wanted to say I finished it and adored it. I’ll be looking for more of Rachel Neumeier’s books in the future. I read in the extras at the back of the book that she started this book three different ways (with the three main characters) and then decided to make up a plot that tied everything together. Fascinating. Each of the characters were very well-rounded and developed so her method made sense in hindsight. There was also a bit of sweet romance, but the twin stars of this story were the magic and the world itself.

Oblivion

I have to admit that Tom Cruise is not automatically box office gold for me anymore. That said, this role reminded me again that he’s a great actor, equally able to play an action hero and show a lot of soul. In terms of the depth of emotion the character shows, this role reminded me more of Vanilla Sky or Jerry Maguire than Mission Impossible or Minority Report. Nothing about the plot was mind-blowing (i.e. like The Matrix or Inception were the first time I saw them), but it absolutely held my attention. The visuals were stunning. Since this movie is so easy to spoil (and very worth watching!) I’ll just say that it’s set in a post-apocalyptic earth wasteland. Cruise plays a droid technician who’s living a lonely existence with his partner, Vika, when he discovers a human survivor in the wreckage of a recent spaceship crash – a beautiful woman whom he recognizes from his dreams or memories. The story that follows is just trippy enough to be interesting and just a hair’s breadth shy of sappy sentimentalism, all set against a very slick futuristic backdrop. In other words: I loved it!

Never Let Me Go

The most un-science fiction science fiction movie I’ve ever seen. The least creepy beyond-creepy movie I’ve ever seen. This movie is about as far from a movie like Aliens as you can get. There are no monsters jumping out at you, but that doesn’t mean the movie doesn’t have them. But, oh, are they hidden. And besides, the story isn’t about the monsters. It’s about their victims. But by phrasing my thoughts this way, I’m probably giving you a misimpression. This is not a scary movie. It’s a horrifying movie. And there is a difference. I can’t say I loved it. It was too sad and depressing for that. But it did make me think and it was incredibly well done. If you like science fiction movies that are slow and reflective, this is one to rent.

So what is it about? Since I don’t want to ruin your sense of discovery if you watch it, I’ll just say that it’s about a group of children at a boarding school who learn that they aren’t exactly who they always thought they were. More specifically, the story tracks the lives of three of the kids caught in a love triangle. But it isn’t a typical angsty contemporary high school romance drama. The movie was based on Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel of the same name. Ishiguro clearly deals in topics no less weighty than the nature of humanity, the existence of souls, and the ethics of some practices that are still speculative but only all too imaginable.

Noon Onyx Series

White Heart of Justice

We just finished the back cover copy – yay! Will be posting that once I have the new cover. I’ll be offering some fun prizes during that event as well so stay tuned…

How about you? Have you read Assassin’s Gambit, Generation V, or House of Shadows? Have you seen Oblivion or Never Let Me Go? Did you read that book? If so, feel free to share your thoughts and don’t forget to stop by tomorrow for Suzanne Johnson’s post (and a chance to win an iPad 2)!

Dark Light of Day Blog Tour Prize Winners & Wrap Up

By now, I’m hoping you know more about Dark Light of Day than you did two months ago. If you’ve been following along on the tour, you know that there were over a dozen guest blog posts focusing on various aspects of DLOD such as characters, settings, and inspirations. I also posted links to numerous interviews where I discussed Noon Onyx or Dark Light of Day.

Still undecided about whether Dark Light of Day is the right choice for you?

Besides the premise, this information may help you. Dark Light of Day would appeal to readers who like urban fantasy set in a richly detailed world told in a youthful, first person voice. The book would appeal to readers who like mixed genre stories. DLOD has elements of fantasy, romance, mystery, legal fiction, post-apocalyptic fiction, even new adult.

If you are still on the fence about whether this book is the right choice for you, I have a few samplers left. If you live in the U.S., you can use my contact page to request one. If you read the first few chapters, it will give you a good idea of whether you would like it (although, of course, many of the book’s best parts occur later ;-)). What do you have to lose? It’s FREE! 😀

Already a fan of Dark Light of Day? Please help get the word out to a larger crowd by doing the following:

1. Talk it up! Tell everyone. Word of mouth continues to be the best way to support a book or its author. If you liked the book and recommend it to just one other person — that is immensely helpful to me!

2. Give it an honest and fair review on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or Goodreads. This will help readers who have similar reading tastes find it. (Your review doesn’t have to be long. A sentence or two can make a big impact in how the book is found online.)

3. If you genuinely liked it, “like” it on Amazon and take a few moments to agree with the search tags (or create some of your own). This will help other readers find it more easily on Amazon.

For more of my thoughts on the Dark Light of Day tour see my last post, “Tales from the Cyber Road.”

Thank You to Everyone Who Participated in the DLOD Blog Tour!

Roxanne Rhoads at Bewitching Book Tours helped me to organize, schedule, and promote this tour. She did a fantastic job of rounding up interested bloggers, making sure they had all the necessary information for posts, and getting the word out about the tour. She also ran the tour-wide contests, which I was grateful for. She sent me the names of the winners today and they are listed below. I also want to thank my publisher, Penguin, for supplying the Ace/Roc samplers that I gave away at each stop and my editor and publicist who also helped to get the word out about some of the posts.

Finally, I want to thank all of the book bloggers and reviewers who hosted me on their sites, posted promotional materials, and/or reviewed Dark Light of Day. Below is a list of blog tour participants, but my thanks goes out to EVERYONE who took the time to check out Dark Light of Day, recommend it, write a review, and/or “like” it on Amazon. Likely you are doing the same thing for other authors and this helps keep our shared passion (books!) alive.

Tour-Wide Winners!

Thank you to everyone who entered the contest. I very much appreciated all of the comments, tweets, status updates, follows, adds, links and likes. 😀

Here are the winners:

$10 eGift Certificate to either Amazon or Barnes & Noble, winner’s choice, chosen at random from all tour contest entries => Victoria Zumbrum

$10 eGift Certificate to either Amazon or Barnes & Noble, winner’s choice, to be awarded to “the person who brought the most people to the party” => Stella from Ex Libris (Thank you, Stella!!)

3 signed copies of Dark Light of Day, to be sent to the blog tour followers who visited the most stops:

Erin F.

Autumn Nauling

Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez

I’ll be e-mailing everyone tonight to collect eGC choices and U.S. mailing addresses so I can send out the prizes!

What’s Next?

I’m currently working on the third Noon Onyx book. And I’ll be doing some future posts on topics unrelated to DLOD. This Saturday, I’m wrapping up my 2012 Fall Into Winter Darkness Book Blast with an interview of Damien Walters Grintalis, author of the horror novel INK due out from Samhain on 12-4-12. And Roxanne Rhoads is scheduling a cover reveal for Noon Onyx book #2 on December 5th. (If you are interested in participating in the one day cover reveal, please contact Roxanne at Bewitching Book Tours). Hope everyone is having a great week!